Lists

5 Sets of Favorite Fantasy and Sci-Fi Siblings

 

Pic: “Camaron and Raistlin Majere”, Dragonlance/Wizards of the Coast ©

Happy National Siblings Day! Genetically speaking, no one on Earth shares more in common with you than your brother and sister, yet relationships between siblings can be complicated — especially in fantasy and science-fiction. Here are some of our favorite sibling relationships from the books we love.

  • The cover of the book Dragonlance Chronicles Volume 1: Dragons of Autumn Twilight

    Dragonlance Chronicles Volume 1: Dragons of Autumn Twilight

    Caramon and Raistlin Majere
    (Created by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman)

    Caramon is strong and kind, a warrior with a good heart who never hesitates to defend those he loves against the forces of evil. He is especially protective of his brother Raistlin. The wizard is in many ways his polar opposite. Raistlin is weak, both physically and morally. Will their diverging paths break their fraternal bond?

     
  • The cover of the book Dune

    Dune

    Paul and Alia

    Paul Atreides’ may be a long-prophesied messianic figure. His sister, Alia, is a powerful mystic gifted with supernatural powers. Together, they may save the desert dwellers of planet Dune, or destroy them outright — but only if they escape the web of intrigue spun by a powerful nobleman turned enemy.

     
  • The cover of the book Assassin's Apprentice

    Assassin's Apprentice

    The Farseer Trilogy Book 1

    Chivalry, Verity, and Regal

    Chivalry Farseer is brave and well-liked, a noble warrior and king-in-waiting who nonetheless commits a not-so-noble act. His younger brother, Verity, lives in the shadow of his oversized charisma, but prefers it to the glaring spotlight of leadership. Regal, the youngest brother, fall short of his name, seething with jealousy and resentment.

     
  • The cover of the book THE HOBBIT

    THE HOBBIT

    Fili and Kili

    Fili and Kili are the nephews of Thorin, and among his boon companions on the trip to Lonely Mountain. Young yet, they have not entered adulthood by the time of the fateful journey, but still distinguish themselves by their uncommon bravery — even in a company of uncommonly brave dwarves.

     
  • The cover of the book A Game of Thrones

    A Game of Thrones

    A Song of Ice and Fire: Book One

    Stannis, Renly, and Robert Baratheon

    Robert Baratheon, the conquering king, is a portrait in excess. His endless appetite for earthly pleasures is only matched by his unsuitability for the crown he won by force. His younger brother Stannis is in many ways his opposite: taciturn, ill-tempered, and consumed by envy. Renly, the youngest of the three, is largely charming and kind.